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Posts tagged with "sociology"

Hedrick Smith Flyer 10-25-13

Poster “Hedrick Smith Flyer 10-25-13” by Richard Hudak. Download Now!

It’s great to see such decent reporting about sociological findings.

Today many sociologists and neuroscientists believe that regardless of A.D.H.D.’s biological basis, the explosion in rates of diagnosis is caused by sociological factors — especially ones related to education and the changing expectations we have for kids. During the same 30 years when A.D.H.D. diagnoses increased, American childhood drastically changed. Even at the grade-school level, kids now have more homework, less recess and a lot less unstructured free time to relax and play. It’s easy to look at that situation and speculate how “A.D.H.D.” might have become a convenient societal catchall for what happens when kids are expected to be miniature adults. High-stakes standardized testing, increased competition for slots in top colleges, a less-and-less accommodating economy for those who don’t get into colleges but can no longer depend on the existence of blue-collar jobs — all of these are expressed through policy changes and cultural expectations, but they may also manifest themselves in more troubling ways — in the rising number of kids whose behavior has become pathologized.

I would take exception to some of the reasoning of the reporter. For instance, she states.
…The correlations between the implementation of these laws and the rates of A.D.H.D. diagnosis matched on a regional scale as well. When Hinshaw compared the rollout of these school policies with incidences of A.D.H.D., he found that when a state passed laws punishing or rewarding schools for their standardized-test scores, A.D.H.D. diagnoses in that state would increase not long afterward. Nationwide, the rates of A.D.H.D. diagnosis increased by 22 percent in the first four years after No Child Left Behind was implemented.
To be clear: Those are correlations, not causal links. [emphasis added]
To be clear: causation can be inferred from correlation if the rates of ADHD diagnoses follow, in time, the implementation of high stakes testing. In other words, time is sufficient to claim that high stakes testing is a factor contributing to the epidemic of ADHD diagnoses.
(via The Not-So-Hidden Cause Behind the A.D.H.D. Epidemic - NYTimes.com)

It’s great to see such decent reporting about sociological findings.

Today many sociologists and neuroscientists believe that regardless of A.D.H.D.’s biological basis, the explosion in rates of diagnosis is caused by sociological factors — especially ones related to education and the changing expectations we have for kids. During the same 30 years when A.D.H.D. diagnoses increased, American childhood drastically changed. Even at the grade-school level, kids now have more homework, less recess and a lot less unstructured free time to relax and play. It’s easy to look at that situation and speculate how “A.D.H.D.” might have become a convenient societal catchall for what happens when kids are expected to be miniature adults. High-stakes standardized testing, increased competition for slots in top colleges, a less-and-less accommodating economy for those who don’t get into colleges but can no longer depend on the existence of blue-collar jobs — all of these are expressed through policy changes and cultural expectations, but they may also manifest themselves in more troubling ways — in the rising number of kids whose behavior has become pathologized.

I would take exception to some of the reasoning of the reporter. For instance, she states.

…The correlations between the implementation of these laws and the rates of A.D.H.D. diagnosis matched on a regional scale as well. When Hinshaw compared the rollout of these school policies with incidences of A.D.H.D., he found that when a state passed laws punishing or rewarding schools for their standardized-test scores, A.D.H.D. diagnoses in that state would increase not long afterward. Nationwide, the rates of A.D.H.D. diagnosis increased by 22 percent in the first four years after No Child Left Behind was implemented.
To be clear: Those are correlations, not causal links. [emphasis added]

To be clear: causation can be inferred from correlation if the rates of ADHD diagnoses follow, in time, the implementation of high stakes testing. In other words, time is sufficient to claim that high stakes testing is a factor contributing to the epidemic of ADHD diagnoses.

(via The Not-So-Hidden Cause Behind the A.D.H.D. Epidemic - NYTimes.com)

My intro classes read Joel Best’s “Sociologists as Outliers,” from Contexts, but I think he is a bit more critical than Jay Livingston humorously suggests here.
Six years into a marriage is about the peak year for divorce.
Six years ago the ASA proposed to Malcolm Gladwell. We gave him the Award for Excellence in the Reporting of Social Issues, which
honors individuals for their promotion of sociological findings and a broader vision of sociology. The ASA would like to recognize the contributions of those who have been especially effective in disseminating sociological perspectives and research.
We were virgins. Malcolm was our first. He swept us off our feet. He was cute and funny, and famous - he had TED talks, he’d been on NPR! But more important, he made us feel good about ourselves. It wasn’t just the flattery of his beautiful words. He really paid attention to us, we thought, gazing deeply into our articles. He told us that what we did was important, relevant.
It was too good to last, and now the break-up seems imminent. You can see it coming in tweets like this one by Matt Salganik of Princeton sociology. (via Montclair SocioBlog: Separate Ways)

My intro classes read Joel Best’s “Sociologists as Outliers,” from Contexts, but I think he is a bit more critical than Jay Livingston humorously suggests here.

Six years into a marriage is about the peak year for divorce.

Six years ago the ASA proposed to Malcolm Gladwell. We gave him the Award for Excellence in the Reporting of Social Issues, which

honors individuals for their promotion of sociological findings and a broader vision of sociology. The ASA would like to recognize the contributions of those who have been especially effective in disseminating sociological perspectives and research.

We were virgins. Malcolm was our first. He swept us off our feet. He was cute and funny, and famous - he had TED talks, he’d been on NPR! But more important, he made us feel good about ourselves. It wasn’t just the flattery of his beautiful words. He really paid attention to us, we thought, gazing deeply into our articles. He told us that what we did was important, relevant.

It was too good to last, and now the break-up seems imminent. You can see it coming in tweets like this one by Matt Salganik of Princeton sociology. (via Montclair SocioBlog: Separate Ways)

May 1

Poster: Social Movements Course

I’m teaching Social Movements again this summer at UMass Lowell in Summer Session II. Click the link to get the poster.

(via Responses to the Steubenville Verdict Reveal Rape Culture » Sociological Images)

(via Responses to the Steubenville Verdict Reveal Rape Culture » Sociological Images)

Corey Dolgon, Director of Community–Based Learning at Stonehill College, speaks on “American Civic Engagement at the Crossroads” at the University of Massachusetts Lowell.

Corey Dolgon, Director of Community–Based Learning at Stonehill College, speaks on “American Civic Engagement at the Crossroads” at the University of Massachusetts Lowell.

(via Where To Stand On The Elevator [PIC])

(via Where To Stand On The Elevator [PIC])

Work is Becoming More Like Prison As Some Workers Forced to Wear Electronic Bands That Track Everything They Do Including Bathroom Breaks | Alternet

This is Taylorism on digital steroids. Life imitates art.

The Irish Independentreports that…


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What do you think of this?

Work is Becoming More Like Prison As Some Workers Forced to Wear Electronic Bands That Track Everything They Do Including Bathroom Breaks | Alternet

This is Taylorism on digital steroids. Life imitates art.

The Irish Independentreports that…

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What do you think of this?

Feb 7

This is the song I played in Intro Soc this morning. We were talking about Geoff Harkness’s consideration of hip hop culture and the use of the n-word.

(Source: Spotify)

The Sociological Images blog provides further commentary on “their most popular post ever.”
roseaposey:

“Judgments”I took this last year, but in retrospect, I think it’s my strongest piece from high school.
Working on this project really made me examine my own opinions, preconceptions and prejudices about “slutty” women and women who choose to cover all of their skin alike. I used to assume that all women who wore Hijabs were being oppressed, slut-shame, and look down on and judge any woman who didn’t express her sexuality in a way that I found appropriate.
I’d like to think I’m more open now.

The Sociological Images blog provides further commentary on “their most popular post ever.”

roseaposey:

“Judgments”

I took this last year, but in retrospect, I think it’s my strongest piece from high school.

Working on this project really made me examine my own opinions, preconceptions and prejudices about “slutty” women and women who choose to cover all of their skin alike. I used to assume that all women who wore Hijabs were being oppressed, slut-shame, and look down on and judge any woman who didn’t express her sexuality in a way that found appropriate.

I’d like to think I’m more open now.